Experience: Neuengamme

Doris Friedman
Sara Silow
“The SS established Neuengamme in December 1938 as a subcamp of Sachsenhausen concentration camp. It was located on the grounds of an abandoned brickworks on the banks of the Dove-Elbe, a tributary of the Elbe River in the Hamburg suburb Neuengamme, in northern Germany. 

“Investing through the SS-owned German Earth and Stone Works Corporation (Deutsche Erd- und Steinwerke), SS leaders intended to reactivate and renovate the brickworks, using concentration camp laborers. On December 12-13, 1938, the SS brought about 100 prisoners from Sachsenhausen to the site to begin construction of the camp. The first prisoners were housed within the factory itself. 

“In June 1940, the SS decided to establish an independent concentration camp at Neuengamme. By this time, two further transports of prisoners from Sachsenhausen had increased the prisoner population to around 1,000. By the end of that year, approximately 3,000 prisoners were incarcerated in Neuengamme. In August 1943, the prisoner population was approximately 10,000. Until late 1940, most Neuengamme prisoners were of German nationality. After this prisoners from German-occupied territories formed the majority of those incarcerated in Neuengamme. Many of them - via Auschwitz. In all, some 13,000 Jews were prisoners in Neuengamme.”

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.  “Neuengamme.” Holocaust Encyclopedia.
http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005539
Accessed on 6/7/11. 

View of Neuengamme concentration camp

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Photo Archives. Neuengamme Photograph.
Accessed on 6/7/11.


An SS guard watches prisoner laborers at construction work. Neuengamme concentration camp, Germany, wartime. Mahn und Gedenkstaette Neuengamme

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Photo Archives. Neuengamme Photograph.
Accessed on 6/7/11.