Portraits of honor

Our Michigan Holocaust Survivors

Our Michigan Holocaust Survivors is an interactive educational exhibit of the Program for Holocaust Survivors and families

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554 Holocaust Survivors were added to Portraits of Honor

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Portraits of Honor has existed since 1999

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About Project

Portraits of Honor: Our Michigan Holocaust Survivors is an interactive educational exhibit of the Program for Holocaust Survivors and Families, a service of Jewish Senior Life of Metropolitan Detroit.

Portraits of Honor was developed in 1999 under the direction of Dr. Charles Silow, the son of Holocaust Survivors. Its purpose is to document the lives of Holocaust Survivors who have lived in Michigan for education and for posterity. Portraits of Honor is a learning tool about the lives of Survivors through their photographs, biographies, and historical references.

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About Project

Portraits of Honor: Our Michigan Holocaust Survivors is an interactive educational exhibit of the Program for Holocaust Survivors and Families, a service of Jewish Senior Life of Metropolitan Detroit.

Portraits of Honor was developed in 1999 under the direction of Dr. Charles Silow, the son of Holocaust Survivors. Its purpose is to document the lives of Holocaust Survivors who have lived in Michigan for education and for posterity. Portraits of Honor is a learning tool about the lives of Survivors through their photographs, biographies, and historical references.

As you look at the portraits of the Survivors, you will see faces of pain and suffering as well as faces reflecting beauty, resilience, and the triumph of the human spirit.

About Holocaust

The Holocaust, also known as the Shoah, was the genocide of European Jews during World War II. Between 1941 and 1945, Nazi Germany and its collaborators systematically murdered some six million Jews across German-occupied Europe, around two-thirds of Europe's Jewish population. The murders were carried out in pogroms and mass shootings; by a policy of extermination through work in concentration camps; and in gas chambers and gas vans in German extermination camps, chiefly Auschwitz, Bełżec, Chełmno, Majdanek, Sobibór, and Treblinka in occupied Poland.


Germany implemented the persecution in stages. Following Adolf Hitler's appointment as Chancellor on 30 January 1933, the regime built a network of concentration camps in Germany for political opponents and those deemed "undesirable", starting with Dachau on 22 March 1933.

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Our mission is to support Holocaust Survivors and Families and add more Survivor photographs and biographies to the Project.

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